No longer the summer child

Lays the gold sun tithing barren,
Of doubt and dark feeds the sea clouds;
Jack of frost’s fingers cold upon
The pots of fish- wagging shafted wind
On shapeless beaches; splits the wombs

Of tidal pools, dogdayed pulse of summer
Ringing out like a black-tongued bell.
The lame air leaping from its heat,
Now painting ice in the throat of a child,
Shall she be of nothing, shuddered voice

Drained of her words. Shut too, the water’s
Speeches, its salty voice now a thorny spire
Of frost; winter’s tongue punishes the seascape,
Dark-voweled gulls four winded spinning
Into the seaweeds’ iron, choked in the tides.

No longer the summer child, mussels dried
And dying in the pouch, in the grip of cold;
The sleepy man of winter travels the whale road,
Wave and froth choked, combed into a wreath;
Drowns the warmth, foreign to a weather.

Copyright © 11/10/2019 lance sheridan®

N35 No longer the summer child

51 comments on “No longer the summer child

  1. As said the Genius of cold in King Arthur by Purcell, I’m frozen to death.
    Have a good sunday, Lance.

  2. acryforpeace says:

    Wonderfully written. Thank you for sharing this with us!

  3. rabirius says:

    This is a brilliant poem again.

  4. Beautiful poetry Lance and so perfect right now!

  5. Nicely penned words, Lance. Too good

  6. crazywitch25 says:

    Simply beautiful! Good job!

  7. allenrizzi says:

    Great as usual. I have noticed a lot of your imagery seems to be connected to the sea. Did you grow up or live in a coastal region?

  8. Wow and wow. I love the imagery in this and the enjambment intensifies it. Many stand out lines but these ones:

    On shapeless beaches; splits the wombs

    Of tidal pools, dogdayed pulse of summer

    Amazing.

  9. charef says:

    Vous êtes bien inspiré. vos mots dégagent de belles images émotionnelles.

  10. Lovely. So visual and tactile. I felt so immersed in the scene.

  11. Devon Brock says:

    Lance, the sea can be used to conjure a great deal of meaning, something you do quite well. Which is why I dig through your poems. Your work is very precise, so no word should be overlooked, as you take great care in choosing them. So here, in this poem, I see a man getting or gotten up there in years, reflecting on his one great love from so long ago. Such a love that none came after and he is haunted by her memory. But he is old now, lacking virility – “mussels dried / And dying in the pouch”. To move forward, along the whale road (nice use of a kenning I might add), he has to put this away – ‘drown the warmth” so to speak, because he knows he is now “foreign” to this girl, “a weather”.

    I may be way off, of course, but that is what I imagine in this fine poem.

    D

    • Devon, and that’s why we write, for we know each reader will interpret our work differently. Just as in a painting. It is what the mind interprets through the eyes. When I wrote this poem, the
      child is the sea, saying goodbye to summer. I’m always very appreciative of your takes on my poetry, to which is gratifying in itself. Thank you!

  12. A perfect poem for November, especially in a seafaring region such as this. Thank you, Lance. If there were batting averages kept for poets, you would top the charts!

  13. Wonderful free verse, especially your third stanza!
    I’m curious as to your writing style, Lance – do you take off from an image that sparks your imagination, or do you write and then go hunting for an image that does justice to your words?
    Have a great week, my friend, cheers!

  14. Love the way you write flowing from the bright and warm summer to the frozen and chilled winter.

  15. Fall Fraust says:

    I’m loving the style of your writing, it feels like poems of ye olden times 🙂 Truly captivating.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s